Four decades of the Nobel to García Márquez

Four decades after Gabriel García Márquez won the Nobel Prize for literature in October 1982 and after half a century of uninterrupted glory, tributes and canonizations, one sometimes has the feeling that in the runaway chariot of success his figure meant a deflagration that crushed and hid several generations of Latin American authors.
Since then radical changes have taken place and we live in another era marked by new paradigms, the main one being the end of the Gutenberg era and the beginning of the digital and internet era in which the ways of reading, consecrating and disseminating literary works changed radically.
The literary patriarchal figures that represented continents and languages ​​such as Victor Hugo, Tolstoy, Goethe, Whitman, Tagore and many others have been left forever in the past and we live in an era of literary proliferation where the figuration of authors is fleeting, similar to the villains that the wind takes.
The commercialization of literature in the hands of the large publishing multinationals,
more and more concentrated, forces the authors hired by them to publish whatever it takes each season to stay in the attention of the people. And in many cases the figures of entertainment, singers, actors, vedettes, celebrities, politicians, criminals, have replaced the real authors condemned by the cultural industry to the most hateful ostracism.
Writing for fame, seeking fame, obtaining rigged prizes or negotiated and false honors
it has become the law in this era of proliferation where writing is a cosmic abyss of silence and oblivion.
Thinkers, readers, those who explore forms, write with the heart and from passion out of deep need, or practice poetry from silence, fortunately have no place in that vanity fair that the world of commercial publishing has become.
Now authors are manufactured and inflated as if they were hamburgers and many innocent men and women inflated by propaganda end up believing that they are great and will travel to glory like the Latin American Nobel Prize winners.
But the difference between these Latin American tutelary figures and many others who did not obtain that award, such as Borges or Rulfo, but left remarkable works, is that they were not created and launched as products for immediate consumption. The belief prevailed that literature is only the novel written with insipid prose as commercial publishers now demand, when its spectrum is broader and what is remarkable occurs in poetry, aphorisms, essays or miscellaneous.
Every season hundreds of novels are published that shine for an instant and then disappear into oblivion, but perhaps true literature lives in other hidden spheres, as happened with the Colombian Aurelio Arturo, author of a few poems that can be counted on the fingers of hands, but they are brilliant.
Fortunately, the Cervantes Prize has been rectifying the shot recently, by awarding the medal to lesser-known but notable authors such as Ida Vitale and Cristiana Peri Rossi, leaving aside the vedettes of the novel promoted by multinationals.
When celebrating the four decades of the Nobel Prize awarded to the Colombian from Aracataca, it is good to reflect on what literature means, which is above all the happiness of reading and traveling through space and time. It doesn’t matter if you write for nothing and no one, because literature always illuminates the night of time under the rain or the starry sky.

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Four decades of the Nobel to García Márquez