the great surgeon

I have been lucky to meet great surgeons. At the age of nine, the mythical Don Plácido G. Duarte operated on me for appendicitis, to whom I dedicated the first poetry of my life when I woke up from anesthesia. I met Dr. Christian Barnard in Madrid, the South African surgeon who performed the first heart transplant. Barnard, as a person, had little interest, unlike his wife, Barbara Zöelner, who was a gorgeous and adorable creature. In the event of suffering a serious vascular episode, I would have let her operate on me rather than her husband, even if she wasn’t a medical doctor. And now, here in the Mountain of Cantabria, I have Dr. Daniel Casanova as a friend, Professor of Surgery, and like all great doctors, a profound humanist. But none of them – and none of the other doctors in the world – can be compared to the great Galician soldier and extraordinary surgeon Francisco Ferrol, whom the socialists call Francisco Franco. Humanity has learned, 47 years after his death, of his enormous dedication to digestive surgery. And it has been a former vice president of the Social Communist Government of Spain, Carmen Calvo from Egabrana, who was in charge of informing us of the unsurpassed capacity of the general and doctor Don Francisco Ferrol Bahacumbre as a surgeon specializing in female gallbladders. The general and doctor was head of the Spanish State for 36 years. I was not a supporter, but it must be recognized that the passage of time has demonstrated many of his virtues and successes. He was not a democrat, and he ruled with a totalitarian system. But he had a high concept of social policy and public works. The president who governs us now is not a democrat either, and he does so with the sole ambition of fulfilling his personal benefits that overshadow the well-being and unity of the Spanish people. What if. It has been the former vice president Carmen Calvo Poyato who has revealed the reality to us. That the general and doctor Don Francisco Ferrol Bahacumbre operated and removed the gallbladder from all the women in Spain, including her. It is estimated, according to the words of Mrs. Carmen Calvo Poyato, that he performed more than thirty million gallbladder surgeries, combining the practice of medicine with his obligations as head of state. Despite having built dozens of public and Social Security hospitals, created by him -he died in La Paz, one of them, and perhaps the most advanced and prestigious of those times-, none of them had the capacity for so many interventions . It is said that he removed the women’s gallbladders in the Santiago Bernabéu stadium, about ten thousand every night. But he never operated on a man. «Franco removed the gallbladder from women. He took it from me », has recognized the embittered prestigious. The gallbladder, as its name suggests, is a small organ that generates bile. The bile reaches the liver and subsequently flows into the duodenum, through a transfer known as the common bile duct, formed by the union of the cystic and hepatic ducts. When bile sludge forms in the bile duct, problems begin, which can be very painful if the biliary sludge turns into a stone that obstructs the cleanliness of its natural path. As has been shown, one can live perfectly without a gallbladder – no woman over 50 has it because Dr. Ferrol, for the Franco socialists, removed it from all of them – but some operation did not go satisfactorily. For example, that of Carmen Calvo, which instead of reducing her bile dose, is itself a pool, a bile needle in the shape of a woman. But the rest of the interventions – free – were carried out perfectly. I have called many of my friends from my youth, and indeed, they have confirmed that Carmen Calvo has spoken late, but accurately. None of them have a gallbladder. To find women with a gallbladder, you have to resort to people under 47 years of age, because neither King Juan Carlos nor Adolfo Suárez removed the gallbladders from the women. They had enough to promote the Transition, the Constitution and some other little thing.

I propose – and I hope that Carmen Calvo joins my proposal – the posthumous Nobel Prize in Medicine for the general and doctor, for the great gallbladder surgeon, Mr. Francisco Ferrol Bahacumbre, for the socialists, Francisco Franco.

We would like to thank the writer of this short article for this awesome web content

the great surgeon