The most bizarre scientific research was recognized at the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony

The winners were recognized with a PDF diploma and a bill of 10 trillion dollars from Zimbabwe, a currency that has now disappeared, which is equivalent to about three hundredths of a dollar.

Science is everywhere. Or at least that’s what scientists at Harvard University think in conjunction with a popular science magazine, which organizes the Ig Nobel prizes every year, recognizing the most exotic and bizarre scientific findings in the world. The approximate translation of the name of these awards would be “ignoble” and in their more than 30 years of experience they have already earned the respect and sense of humor of a large part of the international community.

The winners were recognized with a PDF diploma and a bill of 10 trillion dollars from Zimbabwe, a currency that has now disappeared, which is equivalent to something like three hundredths of a dollar. But beyond the scientific wink, some research is very interesting. In the Cardiology triplet, for example, an investigation published in one of Nature’s subsidiary journals was awarded.

This work was dedicated to investigating what are the reactions of a person’s heart when facing a blind date for the first time. The results indicate that there is evidence that when two people who do not know each other are attracted to each other during a date, their hearts tend to synchronize their beats.

In the Biology trio, the award went to researchers in Brazil who studied scorpions. These arthropods can voluntarily detach some parts of their body when attacked by a predator and thus manage to escape.

What the researchers found is that when this happens, the scorpions can regrow those lost limbs. However, when what they lose is their tail, their anuses cannot regenerate and the scorpions end up dying from constipation.

In the Economy shortlist, the winners were a group of researchers who studied which factor weighs more when it comes to achieving job success, talent or luck. “Our model shows that a certain degree of talent is needed to be successful in life, but the most talented people rarely reach the highest positions, being surpassed by moderately talented individuals, but sensibly luckier,” the study authors detailed.

In the Physics category, a research carried out at the renowned University of Cambridge that tried to answer the question of why ducks swim in a row and how much energy they save by swimming in this way won. What they found was that “by riding the wake generated by her mother, the duckling following her gains a significant reduction in wave resistance and is pushed forward.” This is the first study to reveal that this evolutionary strategy of waterfowl actually saves energy for line members.

In the rest of the categories, an investigation that found archaeological evidence that the ancient Mayans used enemas to intoxicate themselves with alcohol in ritual contexts stands out. And also a study that shows that the fault of legal texts being illegible does not lie in the use of specialized concepts and words, but simply in the fact that those who write them write badly.


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The most bizarre scientific research was recognized at the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony