Kendrick Lamar’s Theory Offers Meaning Behind Oklama’s Nickname

This article is automatically translated from the original language to your language. Do not hesitate to let us know if it contains translation errors so that we can correct them as soon as possible.

Kendrick Lamar has adopted many nicknames throughout his illustrious career – K. Dot, King Kendrick, Cornrow Kenny, Kung Fu Kenny. As the Compton native prepares to open a new chapter with his upcoming album Mr. Morale and Big Stepshe took another new pseudonym: oklama.

Kendrick introduced the name last August when he launched the oklama.com website, through which he announced that his fifth album will mark its final release on Top Dawg Entertainment, the label he has called home since the the start of her career. The name reappeared in K. Dot, Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers’ press release, as well as their recent video for “The Heart Part 5.”

Like most of his productions, Kendrick Lamar has yet to explain the meaning of his latest moniker, leaving his fervent fanbase to form their own theories in search of answers. But one particularly curious fan may have just solved the mystery.

On Tuesday, May 10, Spotify’s Dissect podcast released a video on social media exposing the “likely origins” behind Kendrick Lamar’s oklama alias. In the 47 second clip, Dissect host Carl Cuchna theorizes that Oklama “probably originated from Chahta Anumpa, the language of the indigenous Choctaw people”.

“Okla, which you may recognize from Oklahoma, means ‘people’ in Choctaw,” he says. “The Choctaw definition for ‘my’ is a marker used to address someone, such as ‘my lord.’ Oklama therefore translates to “my people.” In Choctaw translations of the Bible, the phrase oklama is often used when a poet or prophet addresses God’s people in the name of God.

“Oklama meaning ‘my people’ seems to fit exactly with the message of ‘The Heart Part 5’, which begins with a quote from Oklama, ‘I am. All of us.’ Kendrick even specifically says “my people” just before he starts rapping.

Dissect Co-writer Femi Olutade (whose findings informed the video) bolstered the theory by pointing to Kendrick Lamar and Jay Rock’s 2011 collaboration “My People,” on which they rapped about the tragedy of the Black-on murders. -Black.

associated editorial
Every verse Kendrick Lamar has dropped since “DAMN.”
April 14, 2022

He added: “Black people committing violence against black people is a central theme in ‘The Heart Part 5’, most clearly in the third verse where Kendrick embodies the spirit of Nipsey Hussle who speaks from heaven after being killed by another Black. 2019.”

Although Kendrick Lamar has yet to (and is unlikely to) address the Choctaw theory behind Oklama, it wouldn’t be the first time he’s identified with a historical culture that originated in Oklama. beyond his hometown of Compton, California.

On DAMN. in 2017, the Pulitzer Prize-winning MC said, “I’m an Israelite, don’t call me black no,” while including a voicemail from his cousin Carl Duckworth proclaiming, “So-called blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans are the true children of Israel.

Watch Kendrick Lamar’s “The Heart Part 5” video below. His new album Mr. Morale and Big Steps falls on Friday (May 13).

[Contenu intégré]

This article is automatically translated from the original language to your language. Do not hesitate to let us know if it contains translation errors so that we can correct them as soon as possible.

We want to give thanks to the writer of this article for this remarkable content

Kendrick Lamar’s Theory Offers Meaning Behind Oklama’s Nickname